Anesthesia - what to ask your doctor - adult

Anesthesia - what to ask your doctor - adult

Definition

You are scheduled to have a surgery or procedure. You will need to talk with your doctor about the type of anesthesia that will be best for you. Below are some questions you may want to ask your doctor.

Alternate Names

What to ask your doctor about anesthesia - adult

Questions

Which type of anesthesia is best for me and the procedure that I am having?

  • General anesthesia
  • Spinal or epidural anesthesia
  • Conscious sedation

When do I need to stop eating or drinking before having the anesthesia?

Is it alright to come alone to the hospital, or should someone come with me? Can I drive myself home?

If I am taking the following medications, what should I do?

  • Aspirin, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), naproxen (Aleve), other arthritis drugs, vitamin E, clopidogrel (Plavix), warfarin (Coumadin), and any other drugs that make it hard for your blood to clot
  • Sildenafil (Viagra), vardenafil (Levitra), or tadalafil (Cialis)
  • Vitamins, minerals, herbs, or other supplements
  • Medicines for heart problems, lung problems, diabetes, or allergies
  • Other medicines I am supposed to take everyday

If I have asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, or any other medical problems, do I need to do anything special before I have anesthesia?

If I am nervous, can I get medicine to relax my nerves before going into the operating room?

During the anesthesia:

  • Will I be awake or aware of what is happening?
  • Will I feel any pain?
  • Will someone be watching and making sure I am okay?

After the anesthesia wears off:

  • How soon will I wake up? How soon before I can get up and move around?
  • How long will I need to stay?
  • Will I have any pain?
  • Will I be sick to my stomach?

If I had spinal or epidural anesthesia, will I have a headache afterwards?

What if I have more questions after the surgery? Who can I talk to?

Review Date:12/20/2012

Reviewed by:Robert A. Cowles, MD, Associate Professor of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, David R. Eltz, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.

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