Medicare Part D

Get as low as $0 copays when you enroll in select plans1

Lower your out-of-pocket costs with our Medicare Part D Savings Guide.

Medicare Part D

Get as low as $0 copays when you enroll in select plans1

Lower your out-of-pocket costs with our Medicare Part D Savings Guide.
Get as low as $0 copays when you enroll in select plans
Lower your out-of-pocket costs with our Medicare Part D Savings Guide.

Enrollment Eligibility

If you have Medicare Part A or Part B, you’re eligible to enroll in Medicare Part D or change your plan every year during its Open Enrollment Period: October 15–December 7.

After the Open Enrollment Period, you may be eligible to make changes to your coverage during certain times each year. For information on yearly enrollment periods, visit medicare.gov.

When am I eligible for Medicare Part D?

You’re about to turn 65

This is your Initial Enrollment Period. Unless you plan on delaying enrollment because of employer coverage or are disabled, you should enroll within three months (before or after) of your 65th birthday in order to avoid a late enrollment penalty.

Your employer coverage is ending

You can delay Part D enrollment if you’re still covered by your employer or spouse’s health insurance—even after you turn 65. Once your coverage ends, you need to enroll in Medicare within two months to avoid a penalty.

You have a qualifying disability

If you are under 65 but have a qualifying disability (such as ALS or renal failure), you can enroll in Part D three months before and after your 25th month of getting Social Security or disability benefits.

When am I eligible for Medicare Part D?

  • You’re about to turn 65

    This is your Initial Enrollment Period. Unless you plan on delaying enrollment because of employer coverage or are disabled, you should enroll within three months (before or after) of your 65th birthday in order to avoid a late enrollment penalty.

  • Your employer coverage is ending

    You can delay Part D enrollment if you’re still covered by your employer or spouse’s health insurance—even after you turn 65. Once your coverage ends, you need to enroll in Medicare within two months to avoid a penalty.

  • You have a qualifying disability

    If you are under 65 but have a qualifying disability (such as ALS or renal failure), you can enroll in Part D three months before and after your 25th month of getting Social Security or disability benefits.

Ready to enroll?

Compare and enroll in Part D plans from more than 180 major carriers for FREE with eHealth, an independent insurance broker.2

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1 $0 copay on Tier 1 generic drugs available through select plans that include Walgreens as a Preferred Pharmacy.

2 HealthPlanOne is a licensed insurance broker. No commissions are paid to Walgreens.

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